Last edited by Dour
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of The fall army worm found in the catalog.

The fall army worm

Philip Luginbill

The fall army worm

by Philip Luginbill

  • 267 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Armyworms.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Philip Luginbill.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 34, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 34.
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination92 p. :
    Number of Pages92
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23000556M

    Fall armyworm (FAW) poses a serious threat to food security in sub-Saharan Africa. Originally from the Americas, FAW outbreaks first occurred in West Africa in early and are now on the precipice of devastating food supplies across the continent, exacerbating global poverty and hunger. Adult. Fall armyworm adults (moths) have a wing span of about inches ( cm). The upper portion of the forewings are a mottled dark gray, with a distinctive white spot near the dorsal tip, or apex, of the wing, while the lower portion of the forewings is a light gray to brown color (Fig. 9; Oliver and Chapin ).The hind wings appear light gray to white.

      If left untreated, fall armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) can destroy a pasture or field of crops in a very short Locke, soils and crops consultant, shows you how to identify the fall armyworm caterpillar, signs of damage that you will see on grass or crops and available chemical treatments to control the pest. Genre/Form: book: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Fall armyworm. [Washington, D.C.]: Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

    AN invasion by fall armyworm (FAW) into the country's seven farming provinces could devastate an otherwise promising maize crop, more so as it emerged this week that there are no proper chemicals.   The effect of a fall armyworm attack on a maize at Mallayapuram near Sempatti in Dindigul district. File photo Collector asks them to take precautionary measures against the worm.


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The fall army worm by Philip Luginbill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) 2 Duration of the egg stage is only two to three days during the summer months.

Larva There usually are six instars in fall armyworm. Head capsule widths are about,and mm, respectively, for instars 1–6. Larvae attain lengths ofFile Size: 2MB. The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, ) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is the most important noctuid pest in the Americas and has recently become an invasive pest in Africa.

The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an insect native to the tropical and subtropical Americas that has recently spread to Africa, where it.

Due to its wide host range, high reproductive and dispersal capacity, the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), which is native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, has become a major invasive pest on corn (Zea mays L.). It is rapidly spreading in Africa, the Near East and Asia [].In DecemberFAW was first found in Yunnan Province in China and has Author: Yunhe Li, Zhenying Wang, Jörg Romeis.

The fall armyworm has four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Adult moths (Fig. 3) are generally gray, with a 1½-inch wingspan and white underwings. The forewings are mottled with flecks of white, and males may have a triangular white spot in the middle of the wing and another spot near the wingtip.

First detected in Kagoshima Prefecture in July last year, the fall armyworm has caused damage in about 30 of the nation’s 47 prefectures. It devours the leaves and stems of about 80 plant. Pheromone receptors (PRs) found in the antennae of male moths play a vital role in the recognition of sex pheromones released by females.

The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda, is a notorious invasive pest, but its PRs have not been reported. In this report, six candidate PRs (SfruOR6, 11, 13, 16, 56 and 62) suggested by phylogenetic analysis were cloned, and their tissue–sex.

1. Introduction. Fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) is a lepidopteran polyphagous pest native to tropical and subtropical America, where it is one of the most important maize pests, for example in Central America and Brazil (Cruz et al., ; Sarmento et al., ).It belongs to the genus Spodoptera, known as armyworms, the group of Noctuidae that causes.

Bengaluru: An invasive caterpillar from the Americas that devours crops is fast spreading through India, having marked its presence in 10 states within nine months since the first time it was detected.

The Fall Armyworm (FAW) is currently making its way through the maize fields of southern and eastern India, affecting not just thousands of farmers but also the poultry industry, which relies. The fall armyworm which was detected in West Africa in has destroyed thousands of hectors of farmlands.

The fall armyworm has appetite for consuming maize, cereals, and leafy vegetables. The Bunkpurugu-Nakpanduri MoFA Director, Mr. Suwale Abukari confirmed to DAILY GUIDE that the fall armyworm has resurfaced in the district but was quick.

the arrival of fall armyworm (FAW) in Africa has the potential to cause maize yield losses in a range from to milliontonnes per annum, in the absence of any control methods, in just 12 maize-producing countries. This represents a range of 21%% of the annual averaged production of maize over a three year period in these countries.

Fall Armyworm Prevention and Treatment. Prevention Unlike the sod webworm, fall armyworms can be more difficult to control. It is helpful to always maintain good cultural practices such as mowing, reducing thatch, and lightly irrigating your lawn. Building a healthy lawn will help it. Sex attractant of the fall armyworm moth (Technical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture) Unknown Binding – January 1, by A.

A Sekul (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Author: A. A Sekul. In discussing different strategies for the application of control measures against major agricultural pests in the USA, the author concludes that little progress has been made during the past few decades in reducing damage without causing ecological disruption, and that the best prospect for a solution to the heavy economic losses caused by the migratory pest Spodoptera frugiperda (J.

Smith). The MP Insecticide Recommendations contains a complete list of chemicals, application instructions, and grazing/hay restrictions for the products that the Cooperative Extension Service suggests to use for fall army worm control. Fall Armyworm. Appearance: The larvae stage of the adult Armyworm moth, is a Fall Armyworm that is typically 1”-2” in length.

They are light in color, usually light tan, green, or gray, and they have dark blackish-brown heads. They may have yellow coloring on their head area, too.

They also have small black dots that are spotted down the length of their bodies. The fall army worm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a destructive invasive insect pest of cereal crops native to American continent.

It is a polyphagous insect with host range of more than plant species and maize is a preferred host. The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is a species in the order Lepidoptera and is the larval life stage of a fall armyworm term "armyworm" can refer to several species, often describing the large-scale invasive behavior of the species' larval stage.

It is regarded as a pest and can damage and destroy a wide variety of crops, which causes large economic damage.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Luginbill, Philip. Fall army worm. Washington: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Material Type. Fall Armyworm Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), FAW, is an insect native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas.

Its larval stage feeds on more than 80 plant species, including maize, rice, sorghum, millet, sugarcane, vegetable crops and cotton. FAW can cause significant yield losses if not well managed.

Fall armyworm (FAW) - or Spodoptera frugiperda - is a dangerous transboundary pest native to the Americas that has been spreading rapidly in Africa sincecausing significant yield losses to crops. Farmer education and community action are critical elements in the strategy to manage FAW.

The fall armyworm has affected crops in 18 Chinese provinces and is predicted to reach China’s corn belt this month, with a high probability of spreading to the entire grain-producing area next. Extensive testing with Rebearth in East Africa shows on thousands of locations a complete eradication of Fall Army worm.

Bonus is a doubling of harvest, mainly on maize, but also on many other crops like sorghum and green beans. Product is available, organic and non-chemical, totally harmless, even safe to swallow.